1. This is a photo

    villavanukas:

pipopapo:

鎖のめんどくさくない描き方

fuck where was this tutorial i’ve needed it my whole life omg

    villavanukas:

    pipopapo:

    鎖のめんどくさくない描き方

    fuck where was this tutorial i’ve needed it my whole life omg

    (via kultasieppo)

    Posted on: 25th May 2012 - 65,657 notesReblog

  2. This is mostly text

    Costumes: the Wearable Dialog

    dresdencodak:

    I mentioned before some of my favorite character designs in the world of comics and have been meaning to tackle this subject again.  I came to realize, however, that “character design” is itself a fairly massive subject, and that it would be best to break the topic down into separate installments.  Today, true believers, we’re going to talk about outfits and costumes, which are often a pivotal part of a character’s design.

    3 Essential Questions

    Clothing can convey quite a bit of conscious and unconscious information to the reader, but it should never be doing 100% of the legwork.  Body language, shape and overall behavior all come into play when building a character, and the trick is to figure out what clothing can do that these other elements can’t.  To get started, it’s important to ask some basic questions about your character before jumping into costume design.

    1) Costume Hierarchy


    How often does this character appear?  Is it a main character or a side one? Primary characters have more complex needs than side characters, which is to say that the more information you have about your character, the more that can be conveyed in their appearance.  Additionally, the more frequent the character appears, the more versatile the design needs to be.

    2) Environmental Relationship


    If it’s a side character that only ever appears in one setting, for example, you need only design the outfit to fit in that environment.  If they are a main character, though, chances are you’ll need the outfit to mesh with more than one setting.  

    3) The Naked Test


    Is your character recognizable without any clothes on?  Body types, especially those of the main cast, should be distinctive even without the help of any outfits.  The naked form is the foundation of all character design.  Before you start dressing your body, make sure it’s a body worth dressing.

    Once you’ve sufficiently answered these questions, it’s time to jump into the actual design phase!

    Shape

    Every character, no matter how complex, should be designed around an overal unique visual shape.  This theme should not repeat in any other character.  This shape should be readable enough that if you were to shrink all your characters into a super-simplified cartoony state, they should still be distinguishable.  Character designs follow a hierarchy: you grab the reader’s attention with the most essential information and then invite them to investigate the details.  If important elements of your design are only evident in the details, then it needs to be reworked.  If your character is not completely distinguishable in silhouette, it needs to be reworked.  Detail should always radiate from the core theme.

    Kim and Vonnie stay distinct in a few ways.  

    The primary difference in shape between the above two characters is one of curves versus triangles.  Vonnie is very angular, and her clothing’s angles mimic the scaffolding of an art deco building to emphasize her height and posture.  Kim’s outfit makes her look shorter, but jaunty.  There are a lot of soft curves going on there to make her seem younger and more innocent.

    Action

    What does your character do?  In what way would their clothing reasonably convey how they spend their time?  This is an easy question if it’s a uniformed occupation, but it certainly doesn’t stop there.  A more bookish or socially inept character is often prone to mismatched clothing, while a person of a very high social status is often wearing clothing that is physically less practical than those of the working class.

    How does your character move?  What are their default postures and body language?  A good outfit should accentuate the body movements that you deem most important.  If a character stoops and hunches a lot, their clothes can augment that behavior.  For example, Kim is frequently hunched over, so I tend to dress her with a hood that’s shaped to go with poor posture, as well as a repeating “arch” shape to suggest this basic form.

    Communication

    How much does the character wish to communicate with their clothing?  Not everyone wears their personality on their sleeve, nor is everyone especially fashion-conscious.  Nothing’s worse than having a cast where everyone is immaculately dressed and overdesigned.  A more outgoing character might be more aware of their appearance, while a more introverted one may be less concerned.  To add another layer, a character may dress a certain way to disguise something they don’t want to show to others, just as someone might act overconfidently to hide their insecurities.  You can tell your audience a lot about your character through what that character chooses to display to others.

    Repetition

    Core shapes and patterns should repeat on the outfit.  The entire design should exhibit some bilateral cohesion, which is to say if you were to cut the character in half horizontally or vertically, each part should look like it belongs to the other.  

    As mentioned, Kim has a lot of solid colors and arch shapes which are broken up by fabric and metal seams, with very few sharp edges.  

    Vonnie, on the other hand, is structured almost like a building, with vertical lines and triangles that take the shape of supporting beams on the surface of her outfit.  Her triangles and broad horizontal planes repeat throughout her outfit, including her glasses.

    This extends to multiple costumes worn by the same character.  Even if a particular character changes clothes, the core shapes should still be evident.  Scott Pilgrim is a good example of this.  Most of the cast change clothes frequently, but in each scene it’s generally easy to recognize the characters by the “type” of clothing they choose.  The details change, but the essential shapes do not.

    Color and Contrast

    Different colors can imply different moods.  ”Winter” colors like cooler blues and purples can suggest an introspective or reserved personality, while warmer colors like yellow or red can imply a more energetic attitude.  If your character only ever interacts in one type of setting, you only have to worry about how those colors will fit in one environmental color palette.  If, however, your character needs to mesh well with more than one environment (as is usually the case with protagonists), you have to make sure your character’s colors will fit with multiple settings.

    Also, don’t be fooled by superhero comics: it’s generally bad form to have two dominant colors in a single costume.  My personal rule of thumb is to have no more than one prime color in an outfit design, followed by a secondary and then supporting colors.  

    In the case of Kim’s outfit in Dark Science, the primary color is black, with the secondary being off-white.  These are then supported by the muted blue and silver accents that appear in both her prosthetics and clothing.  Color and value contrast is very important, especially for a main character, which is why Kim’s basic palette can be reduced to black and white without losing any essential information.  

    Vonnie’s outfit is more colorful, but less contrasted as a whole.  Green dominates and is blocked in by a secondary, warmer black.  Green is the complementary color of red, and so her clothes naturally bring attention to her hair and reddish skin tone, inherently highlighting more sexual elements than Kim (whose black outfit essentially matches her hair).  White is also present, but it’s only a supporting color here.

    Simplicity

    Above all else, keep it simple.  Comic characters are not pin-ups or other illustrations; you have to draw them over and over again, from various angles.  If you pile on too much detail, you’ll wear yourself out slogging through all the bits every time you have to draw them.  

    If you follow all these rules, good costume design should create this basic pattern when presented to a reader:

    1. Read:  Silhouettes and essential shapes should be instantly recognizable
    2. Inform:  The costume should then tell the reader essential things about the character
    3. Compel:  The costume should then invite the reader to learn more about the character
    4. Move:  The costume should never impede the flow of action within the comic

    If you stick to these basic guidelines, you’ll never fail.  Next up on character design: bodies and faces!

    (via kujoapologist)

    Posted on: 27th April 2012 - 14,688 notesReblog

  3. This is a photo

    p5stuck:

letmefixthatyaoiforyou:


So, other glaring anatomy problems aside… how do muscles in the torso work?

Ah, a very good question. This isn’t really yaoi but I’ll do it anyway since it’s such a good question. to be frank I’m not really an expert on the muscles specifically since I tend to focus more on the overall shape than interior detail things (plus I like drawing skinny guys so the my treatment of muscle is usually really subtle) so I’ll just show how I organize the male torso:

I break it into groups. Green is the pectorals, which sit on top of the ribcage (in red), which transitions into the abdominals (blue) aaaand yellow is kinda just “everything else”. oh and the blue dots are there to point out a subcutaneous landmark (meaning “below the skin”, a place where the bone comes very close to the surface that is good to help navigate the body) of the Iliac crest on the pelvis, just because I love that landmark it’s so useful. I googled “male torso” and did the same to a sculpture I found so you can, like, see it in action or something

Ok stuff:
it’s IMPORTANT to realize that the pectorals are on top of the ribcage. see on the line drawing on the left, the area around the left armpit, see how everything layers. there’s an overlapping indicated where the ribcage swells forward from underneath the thickness of the pectoral. emphasizing this line really pushes the skinniness of the body, though it is still good to put it there on guys who work out more (it keeps a rounder, bigger, pec from looking like a boob)
next, keep in mind that the torso has thickness as well as width:

it varies from person to person but I find it generally ideal to have the bellybutton here:

Also something I see a LOT in yaoi manga is people outlining all these muscles with solid lines; no :( Well I guess it’s kind of unavoidable if you’ve only got black and white to work with, so if you need to put lines on the interior, make sure they 1) don’t outline things and instead are placeholders for where a shadow would be, and 2) aren’t drawn with the same line quality/thickness as the outlines of the body. the point is to make soft contours look like soft contours with a softer line, right?

Honestly I’d avoid putting any lines to indicate abs altogether unless I was drawing the Hulk or something, but I wanted to see if I could do it in an acceptable way so I drew this. it looks fine I think. if it’s in a black and white line drawing sure, but if I were doing full color and shading on it then I would never leave those lines in, and instead let my rendering tell the viewer that there are abs there. I attempted to do that to the submitted drawing (it’s low res so it didn’t work out as well as it could have, but you can get the idea)

I tried my best :|;;;
anyway since the torso and shoulders are connected I have this post as suggested reading

I tried doing this in some figure study doodling and HOLY SHIT thank you, none of the framework techniques were working with me because they were sticks or expecting you to know how to pull off depth and this is SUPER HELPFUL for placing parts of the torso in proportion and drawing decent muscles
(so is the arm one, seriously)

    p5stuck:

    letmefixthatyaoiforyou:

    So, other glaring anatomy problems aside… how do muscles in the torso work?

    Ah, a very good question. This isn’t really yaoi but I’ll do it anyway since it’s such a good question. to be frank I’m not really an expert on the muscles specifically since I tend to focus more on the overall shape than interior detail things (plus I like drawing skinny guys so the my treatment of muscle is usually really subtle) so I’ll just show how I organize the male torso:

    I break it into groups. Green is the pectorals, which sit on top of the ribcage (in red), which transitions into the abdominals (blue) aaaand yellow is kinda just “everything else”. oh and the blue dots are there to point out a subcutaneous landmark (meaning “below the skin”, a place where the bone comes very close to the surface that is good to help navigate the body) of the Iliac crest on the pelvis, just because I love that landmark it’s so useful. I googled “male torso” and did the same to a sculpture I found so you can, like, see it in action or something

    Ok stuff:

    it’s IMPORTANT to realize that the pectorals are on top of the ribcage. see on the line drawing on the left, the area around the left armpit, see how everything layers. there’s an overlapping indicated where the ribcage swells forward from underneath the thickness of the pectoral. emphasizing this line really pushes the skinniness of the body, though it is still good to put it there on guys who work out more (it keeps a rounder, bigger, pec from looking like a boob)

    next, keep in mind that the torso has thickness as well as width:

    it varies from person to person but I find it generally ideal to have the bellybutton here:

    Also something I see a LOT in yaoi manga is people outlining all these muscles with solid lines; no :( Well I guess it’s kind of unavoidable if you’ve only got black and white to work with, so if you need to put lines on the interior, make sure they 1) don’t outline things and instead are placeholders for where a shadow would be, and 2) aren’t drawn with the same line quality/thickness as the outlines of the body. the point is to make soft contours look like soft contours with a softer line, right?

    Honestly I’d avoid putting any lines to indicate abs altogether unless I was drawing the Hulk or something, but I wanted to see if I could do it in an acceptable way so I drew this. it looks fine I think. if it’s in a black and white line drawing sure, but if I were doing full color and shading on it then I would never leave those lines in, and instead let my rendering tell the viewer that there are abs there. I attempted to do that to the submitted drawing (it’s low res so it didn’t work out as well as it could have, but you can get the idea)

    I tried my best :|;;;

    anyway since the torso and shoulders are connected I have this post as suggested reading

    I tried doing this in some figure study doodling and HOLY SHIT thank you, none of the framework techniques were working with me because they were sticks or expecting you to know how to pull off depth and this is SUPER HELPFUL for placing parts of the torso in proportion and drawing decent muscles

    (so is the arm one, seriously)

    (via kaijudes)

    Posted on: 9th April 2012 - 2,557 notesReblog

  4. This is a photo

    underwaterumbrellas:

ibelievepracticemakesperfect:

Knees by Salacia-of-Vanadiel

    Posted on: 25th March 2012 - 15,459 notesReblog

  5. This is a photo

    greytaliesin:

A super quick trick for drawing draped fabric that my art teacher taught me in high school.

    greytaliesin:

    A super quick trick for drawing draped fabric that my art teacher taught me in high school.

    (Source: hallaheart, via oneknightincamelot)

    Posted on: 16th March 2012 - 69,147 notesReblog

  6. This is a photoset

    mulattafury:

    inhellsdespair:

    greytaliesin:

    okay guys someone the other day asked for a bow tutorial so here it is! :> I hope it is helpful.

    It’s not exactly the most precise archery information but I included what was relevant in terms of actually drawing—and remember as always, references are great in addition to looking through tutorials

    am I even qualified enough to make a tutorial? oh well it was fun

    Tumblr made them weeny but the magnifying glass will take you to full view

    OY EMILY!

    (seriously though this would be great reference if I ever drew anyone using bows :/ 

    maybe i should get back into lotr fandom guyz)

    (Source: hallaheart)

    Posted on: 9th March 2012 - 36,854 notesReblog

  7. This is a photoset

    synnesai:

    medacris:

    Incredibly useful advice. Heels can be tricky!

    /sobs/

    I NEED THIS TOO THANK YOU

    Posted on: 27th February 2012 - 14,496 notesReblog

  8. This is a link

    ectoBiologist: Hey guys, large reference post ]]

    finaltrinity:

    Some of these may be in the wrong category. Some may need to be in another category! Do tell me (either through my ask box or reply) if I need to change or add something! Have fun looking through these accounts!

    HUMAN ANATOMY

    http://anatomicalart.tumblr.com/

    Posted on: 15th February 2012 - 44,949 notesReblog

  9. Theme by Matt Malone
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